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The Relationship Between
Supplements, Fitness, and Recovery

Should supplements be a part of your fitness and recovery routine?

The Important Relationship Between Sleep, Fitness, and Recovery

Improve Your Sleep, Improve Your Workout Recovery.

Supplements & Recovery

The supplement industry is an interesting one. Millions of products make up an industry worth billions of dollars. The sheer number of supplements out there — and all of the related marketing jargon — can get really overwhelming. You may find yourself wondering which supplements you should take to support fitness and recovery, or if you should take them at all. We answer these questions here.

What to Know About Supplements

Supplements are very loosely regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. As it currently stands, the FDA can only investigate supplements after they’re already on the market.

The Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994 (DSHEA) -- the law that stipulates how the supplement industry works -- essentially says that supplement companies are responsible for testing, labeling, and marketing their own products. This has led and still leads to questionable ingredients lists, and it’s important to be careful when selecting supplements.

Supplements for Workout Recovery

Even though loosely regulated, supplements can certainly have a place in a healthy diet.  With a bit of due diligence, safe, high quality supplements are readily available in today's market.

A few key supplements such as protein, amino acids, carbohydrates, and electrolytes can help you reach your fitness goals by optimizing your workout recovery.

What to Know About Supplements

Supplements are very loosely regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. As it currently stands, the FDA can only investigate supplements after they’re already on the market.

The Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994 (DSHEA) -- the law that stipulates how the supplement industry works -- essentially says that supplement companies are responsible for testing, labeling, and marketing their own products. This has led and still leads to questionable ingredients lists, and it’s important to be careful when selecting supplements.

Supplements for Workout Recovery

Even though loosely regulated, supplements can certainly have a place in a healthy diet. With a bit of due diligence, safe, high quality supplements are readily available in today's market.

A few key supplements such as protein, amino acids, carbohydrates, and electrolytes can help you reach your fitness goals by optimizing your workout recovery.

Blue towel and blue shaker on a table in the gym.

Protein and Amino Acids

Protein is quite literally what your muscles are made of, and protein is made up of amino acids. Supplementing with one or both of these can support muscle repair and growth after workouts. However, it’s worth noting that amino acids may not provide an additional benefit if you already get enough protein.

Carbohydrates

Carb lovers, rejoice: Implementing post-workout carbs into your diet is one of the best things you can do for muscle recovery. Consuming quick-digesting carbohydrates soon after a workout helps your body speedily replenish glycogen stores so your muscles can get on with repairs.

Electrolytes

If you sweat, you need electrolytes. (Okay, you need them even if you don’t sweat, but you need more if you do). Electrolytes serve all sorts of functions in your body, one primary function being muscle contraction.

The minerals magnesium and calcium directly contribute to muscle function — without them, you’d suffer many, many cramps and other health consequences. Potassium and sodium help maintain fluid balance, so all of your cells stay properly hydrated. Rehydrating with an electrolyte beverage after workouts is a great way to support whole-body recovery.

Creatine

Creatine has many benefits, but the two most important in terms of workout recovery include creatine as a buffer against lactic acid buildup and its key role in the production of ATP (adenosine triphosphate), the energy molecule that powers muscle contractions. Both of these roles reduce muscle exhaustion, allowing you to work out harder for longer periods of time, as well as work out multiple days in a row without battling severe muscle fatigue.

Front view on caucasian female instructor holding foam massage roller - Young muscular fitness woman going to fascia training - Sporty girl in leggins standing by the window Hold supplement shaker
Blue towel and blue shaker on a table in the gym.

Protein and Amino Acids

Protein is quite literally what your muscles are made of, and protein is made up of amino acids. Supplementing with one or both of these can support muscle repair and growth after workouts. However, it’s worth noting that amino acids may not provide an additional benefit if you already get enough protein.

Carbohydrates

Carb lovers, rejoice: Implementing post-workout carbs into your diet is one of the best things you can do for muscle recovery. Consuming quick-digesting carbohydrates soon after a workout helps your body speedily replenish glycogen stores so your muscles can get on with repairs.

Front view on caucasian female instructor holding foam massage roller - Young muscular fitness woman going to fascia training - Sporty girl in leggins standing by the window Hold supplement shaker

Electrolytes

If you sweat, you need electrolytes. (Okay, you need them even if you don’t sweat, but you need more if you do). Electrolytes serve all sorts of functions in your body, one primary function being muscle contraction.

The minerals magnesium and calcium directly contribute to muscle function — without them, you’d suffer many, many cramps and other health consequences. Potassium and sodium help maintain fluid balance, so all of your cells stay properly hydrated. Rehydrating with an electrolyte beverage after workouts is a great way to support whole-body recovery.

Sleep Keeps You From Falling Ill

Creatine has many benefits, but the two most important in terms of workout recovery include creatine as a buffer against lactic acid buildup and its key role in the production of ATP (adenosine triphosphate), the energy molecule that powers muscle contractions. Both of these roles reduce muscle exhaustion, allowing you to work out harder for longer periods of time, as well as work out multiple days in a row without battling severe muscle fatigue.

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Things to Consider

Things to Consider

Supplements are not a replacement for a healthy diet. It’s always best to take a food-first approach and use supplements to fill in any gaps or provide a boost in certain areas to meet fitness goals.

References

Keys to Recovery

Nutrition

Massage

Rest

Sleep

Stretching

Keys to Recovery

Nutrition

Massage

Rest

Sleep

Stretching